“Like” Foreign Film Fans on Facebook

I finally made a “like”‘ fan page for Foreign Film Fans on Facebook.

Find it, LIKE it, and if you have  pictures, links–or anything to share pertaining foreign films and your experiences, I’ll make you an administrator so you can add it on the page directly ^-^

The Tribeca Film Festival Experience

Danielle (lower left corner) checkin' out the schedule for Tribeca Films @ Chelsea

Danielle and I got lucky, that the movies we wanted to watch were not sold out. With my CUNY student ID, I was given a $2 OFF discount ($14 instead of $16 dollars.) ^-^

So basically, The Tribeca Film Festival is NOT a closed off, exclusive event that I thought it was. In my experience, it was an extra-ordinary movie event (catered by people wearing Tribeca Film press passes) where international films such as “Rat King” and “Head Shot” can be viewed in movie theaters across the TriBeCa region for a period of time.

What makes the festival so intriguing is that you get to watch the movie WITH the director, reporters, and other important people in the movie industry! There’s something about being the first few people to watch a film, and being in the presence of the film makers, that sparks my creative juices!

Me (left) Danielle (right) checkin' out what to see next

Danielle and I were geeking out during the question and answer portion after the movie, and I just had to say something to Finnish director Petri Kotwica ^-^

Unfortunately, due to poor planning (which was the reason for the low $40  budget), we only saw two movies. BUT we plan to plan ahead, and get fancy when the film festival rolls around next Spring ^-^

Movie Tip: If you like film noir, video games & foreign films check out “Rat King.” If you like action, crime, drug films with a twist, take a gander at “Head Shot”

2012 Tribeca Film Festival

TriBeCa Film Festival

TriBeCa Film Festival (Photo credit: summerbl4ck)

I ADORE any sort of  “festival” or  “fair” because it brings like individuals together to appreciate the aesthetics of our times (or different eras)–without nay sayers poo-pooing the festivities (’cause you don’t have to be there if you don’t want to.)

Whether it’s the Renaissance Fair, Comic Con Conventions or the annual Tribeca Film Festival–trust that I will want to be geeking out about it ^-^

I must admit that although I knew of these awesome film festivals, I have no idea how it works, who started it, and when it happens–I didn’t even know little ol’ me could attend without being important >.<

Clearview Cinemas Chelsea @ Tribeca Film Festival

Clearview Cinemas Chelsea @ Tribeca Film Festival (Photo credit: tamaradulva)

Is it a gated or scattered venue(s)? Do I have to produce a film to be part of it? Do I pay once or multiple times?

BUT today, I’m goin’ with a fellow film buff Danielle P. to the annual  Tribeca Film Festival in New York City, to see what the big hooplah is all about!

We didn’t get the opportunity to purchase tickets ahead of time, but we’ll see how much entertainment can be had with my $40 budget.

One of these days, I’ll be featuring MY own film in Tribeca ^-^ But for now I’ll be the wide-eyed nerd looking up at the silver screens going “WTF was that!?!” or “GENIUS!”

-JRB.

 

Why I Love Foreign Films: Magic Without Needing Graphics

CLICK pic to see our Twitter feed for up-to-date tweets on which and when I'm watching movies

I geek out when I talk about the indescribable reasons why I think foreign films have a certain mojo that is lacking in box-office Hollywood films.

I often wondered why I find non-English speaking films (that require subtitles almost 90% of the time) MORE enticing? Could it only be because French sounds sexier than English? Perhaps foreign films are written better? Maybe executed better? More creative perhaps?

Magical world of Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

I mean…It’s easy to see why young adults would love to believe that we can somehow escape the mundane reality with Pan’s Labyrinth by drawing a door  with a chalk to visit another world.  It’s clearly understandable why I’m willing to believe for an instance that a horse who drives a car, can play the piano in  claymation A Town Called Panic: It takes some serious skills and dedication to create such cinamatographical goodness!!!

The Price of Milk (2000)

However,  that doesn’t explain why I would rather watch a woman who collects baby shoes (in a suitcase) living in a farm, trade a quilt for a kine of cows– while fighting for the one she loves; in The Price of Milk, as oppose to watching “No Strings Attached” (with the  overrated Ashton Kutcher)  which I didn’t see but is probably about a boy and a girl who were once strictly platonic and decided to have a sexual relationship (and nothing more), then ended up falling in love; a story that targets demographics like myself!? (take a breath)

Well I think I just figured it out. My friends think I’m psychic because when  we go to the movies I can predict what’s going to happen, almost always to a T: “…after the kiss there  will be a wide shot from behind the car, as it drives off into the sunset.”  But it’s more than just because I learned film for 4 years in college.  I don’t want to know what’s coming next, but I can’t help it, having seen it a million times!!!

I cannot say that all foreign films are written and executed well. I cannot testify that they are all as  creative as The Science of Sleep— or sound sexy like French. But I can say that I gravitate toward films that are unpredictable– with unusual but undeniably engaging plots; as opposed to the typical, predictable– photocopied-to-death box office cash cows in Hollywood. 

Good 'ol Gremlins (1984)


Don’t get me wrong, I love cheesy ’80s- ’90s flicks like “Honey, I shrank the kids”, or “Gremlins”, as much as the next ’90s baby. I equally appreciate easy-goin’ films like “You’ve Got Mail”, “Spaceballs”,  and respect  films like “Benjamin Button”, “Pursuit of Happiness”, “Finding Nemo”, “The Hurt Locker”,  “Pulp Fiction” or “Avatar”, just to name a small few.  I hold in high regards  Tim Burton, James Cameron, Quintin Tarantino, and good ‘ol Steven Spielberg among other creative geniuses that have written and or directed notable American films.

But more often than not, the need for bigger and badder, lets-re-release-a-classic-in-3D, gets in the way of the art that is film.  

A "baby" tree stump that eats people Little Otik (2000)

The foreign films I love are unapologetic, humbling, thought provoking, no-need-to-explain-just- accept-what-you’re-about-to-witness,  that give a sense of perpetual wonder. Films that feel like it comes from the heart,  and not from the pocket.

Soon, I will make a list (I freakin’ love lists) of my favorite foreign films and perhaps some American Independent films as I gather all that I’ve seen in the past 9 years.

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P.S. I respect everyone’s right to like what I don’t, and to love what I loathe, but I’m not going to apologize if I’ve offended anyone. THIS is MY house.

-JRB

The Ghost of Movies Past

image

A bit dramatic I know, but it’s true. Yesterday I started making a list of foreign films I’ve already seen–from the year 2000 to present.

I just got back from the local library and added another +20. So far, I’ve listed 83…but will be bouncing from one library to another, before checking at last in Netflix with the help of Danielle Parker (’cause I’m too poor for Netflix at the moment.)

I couldn’t help myself (of course) so I rented 3 more films to watch lol, and will probably rent more from the next library. I am a woman obsessed!!!

THIS is going to take a while ^.^

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