The Tribeca Film Festival Experience

Danielle (lower left corner) checkin' out the schedule for Tribeca Films @ Chelsea

Danielle and I got lucky, that the movies we wanted to watch were not sold out. With my CUNY student ID, I was given a $2 OFF discount ($14 instead of $16 dollars.) ^-^

So basically, The Tribeca Film Festival is NOT a closed off, exclusive event that I thought it was. In my experience, it was an extra-ordinary movie event (catered by people wearing Tribeca Film press passes) where international films such as “Rat King” and “Head Shot” can be viewed in movie theaters across the TriBeCa region for a period of time.

What makes the festival so intriguing is that you get to watch the movie WITH the director, reporters, and other important people in the movie industry! There’s something about being the first few people to watch a film, and being in the presence of the film makers, that sparks my creative juices!

Me (left) Danielle (right) checkin' out what to see next

Danielle and I were geeking out during the question and answer portion after the movie, and I just had to say something to Finnish director Petri Kotwica ^-^

Unfortunately, due to poor planning (which was the reason for the low $40  budget), we only saw two movies. BUT we plan to plan ahead, and get fancy when the film festival rolls around next Spring ^-^

Movie Tip: If you like film noir, video games & foreign films check out “Rat King.” If you like action, crime, drug films with a twist, take a gander at “Head Shot”

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Aftershock (2010)

FlickJist: Which of your two children will you choose to save, if you can only save one? How would you  feel if you are not chosen—but survived?

Title: Aftershock

Release Date: July 22, 2010

Country: China

Directed by: Feng Xiaogang

Starring: Daoming Chen, Chen Li & Yi Lu

Other films by director(s):  If You Are The One (2008), A World Without Thieves (2004)

Aftershock is what movies are all about: to be able to express complex human emotions with the poetic license to us music, dialogue and visual storytelling.

It’s odd, because although the film is in Mandarin (Chinese dialect), the cinematic quality made me feel as though I was watching a western film. Used sparingly and only when required, digital effects can enhance (rather than destroy) the human experience (like too much 3D.) Either my education in digital media is paying off or I just watch too many movies, but it was bugging me to know that something feels different in this movie, but I couldn’t put my finger on it. Naturally, I turned to Google and I found that Aftershock was produced by IMAX— making it the company’s first (and China’s first) internationally-produced digital media remastered (DMR) film!

As a student in film, I’ve experience how hard it is to re-create everyday simplicity—and end up being dramatic, unrealistic or scripted. This film however, was a happy marriage of feeling theatrical, all the while keeping a sense of authenticity. Usually I get lost in time period films if it’s suddenly brought into the future, because it feels unwarranted and displeasing. However, the 2 hours and 14 seconds of Aftershock didn’t feel like 2 hours, because the characters are well-developed; making it almost necessary to move on into present time.

The last scene of the movie is set in the memorial for the 242,769 who lost their lives from the 1976 Great Tangshan Earthquake (USGS.gov.) It makes me wonder, if this could happen to one family, imagine what the possible stories of the hundred thousands of people who also survived the earthquake?

Like I always say: great movies should always make you think. I’ll be thinking for days.